What Notice Do I Need?
We can prepare and serve a Section 8 and  Section 21 Notice on your tenant. It will inform them that they must either  pay the outstanding rent or to leave the property depending on the circumstances this may be all that is necessary.
  
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1. Section 8 Notice

2. Section 21 Notice

Rent arrears eviction proceedings are brought under Section 8 of the Housing Act 1988 which is used in many other circumstances but most commonly in the case of rent arrears.
 
It only takes 14 days for the Section 8 Notice to expire and then you can proceed to making an application to the court for possession and the money order. To use this process for rent arrears your tenant must be at least 2 months in arrears or 8 weeks if paid weekly. You can use this process at any stage in the tenancy even if there are several months left to run of the fixed term of the tenancy agreement. However, should the tenant rectify the problems possession may not always be obtained. 
  
As part of tenant eviction laws, a Section 21 notice can be issued at any time during the fixed tenancy or during the periodic tenancy. The  Notice must be given in writing to a tenant. The Section 21 notice served during the fixed term of the tenancy must give tenants of an Assured Shorthold Tenancy (AST) a minimum of 2 months’ notice in writing, stating that possession of the property is required.
Possession cannot take place during the fixed term of the tenancy but the notice may be served at any time during the fixed term provided the tenant is given the required minimum of 2 months’ notice
A possession order can only be issued by the court if a Section 21 has been served, assuming the tenant has not left the premises by the expiry date on the notice. If the tenant has not vacated at the end of the period then you can ask county court bailiffs to evict them.
  
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3. Combined Notice

4. House Share / Lodger
  

Some landlords choose to issue both notices. The advantage of this option is that proceedings can usually be commenced sooner under the Section 8 Notice. However, should the tenant rectify the problem and the Section 8 Notice would not allow the landlord to obtain possession, the landlord can still rely on the safety net of the Section 21 Notice.
  
  
Although there is no statutory requirement to end a House and Flat Share or Lodger Agreement, it is always recommended that a formal notice in writing is used. The reason for this is simply to remove the possibility of disputes as to the length of notice and the time it was given if the original agreement provides for a set notice period. We will draft and serve this formal notice on your behalf.
  

  
  
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If you would like further details on the relevant Notices or our services please feel free to contact us on
 
07961-769-418
 
or send and email to info@leconsultant.co.uk